Blog Post #7

Rosseel, J.P. “Are Oral Health Complaints Related to Smoking Cessation Intentions?” Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology 38.5 (2010): 470-78. Web.

  • Rosseel’s studies prove that when dental health care workers bring awareness to their patients about the effects of smoking on oral health the number of smokers lowers greatly.
  • dental health care workers who inform their patients, also known as smoking cessation interventions, are known to be very affective in lowering the amount of smokers
  • “There is an increased risk of periodontal attachment loss and formation of periodontal pockets as well as alveolar bone loss and tooth loss.”

H, Barry. “The Effects of Smoking on Oral Health.” Ezine Articles. Terms of Service Ezines, 3 Feb. 2012. Web.

  • dental health care workers who inform their patients, also known as smoking cessation interventions, are known to be very affective in lowering the amount of smokers
  • “Smoking cigarettes presents a range of hazardous chemical substances into the mouth. These chemical compounds eventually contribute to cancerous change to the oral tissue.”
  • “Tobacco smoking is among the major risk factors for developing gum disease”

Mecklenburg, R. E. Tobacco Effects in the Mouth: A National Cancer Institute and National Institute of Dental Research Guide for Health Professionals. Bethesda, Md.: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, 2000. 28. Print.

  • The development of potentially life-threatening oral lesions is one of the many results of tobacco use.
  • It is important for health professionals to determine if their patient is using tobacco or not
  • Smokers need to visit the dental office more often than nonsmokers

Bloom, Barbara. Smoking and Oral Health in Dentate Adults Aged 18-64. Hyattsville, MD: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2012. Web.

  • “About 4 out of 10 never smokers had very good oral health status compared to 3 out of 10 former smokers and 2 out of 10 current smokers.”

Martin, Terry. “Oral Cancer Overview.” About.com Smoking Cessation. Medical Review Board, 18 Apr. 2007. Web. 01 Apr. 2013.

  • Approximately 90 percent of those diagnosed with oral cancer or pharyngeal cancer are tobacco users.
  • Smokers are six times more likely to get an oral cancer than nonsmokers.
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